Big Tingz A Gwaan Pon NewsTalk93FM

Same like how English capture nuff word from Latin an Greek, dem can dis tek over di word dem from English! Mi tink it plenty better fi try find sinting inna Jamaican fi carry over weh yu waan fi seh from English Siem laik ou Inglish kyapcha nof wod fram Latin an Griik, dem kyan dis tek uova di wod dem fram Inglish! Mi tink it plenti beta fi chrai fain sinting ina Jamiekan fi kyari uova we yu waan fi se fram Inglish. I suppose the translators could simply take over English words in exactly the same way that the English language captured lots of words from Latin an Greek! I think it's much better to try to find a Jamaican equivalent for the English expression.

Emancipation Day At Liberty Hall

In a famous speech delivered in Nova Scotia, Canada, in 1937, Garvey prophetically declared, "We are going to emancipate ourselves from mental slavery because whilst others might free the body, none but ourselves can free the mind. Mind is your only ruler, sovereign. The man who is not able to develop and use his mind is bound to be the slave of the other man who uses his mind, because man is related to man under all circumstances for good or ill."

“Talk Like Miss Lou, Mi No Talk Like Foreigner”

Native speakers of English are often not hooked on ‘correctness’ in the way that up-tight second-language learners often are. They actually experiment with their mother tongue, making it do all sorts of interesting things. Words like ‘bling’ and ‘diss’ have found their way into English – not just as slang – but as ‘respectable’ new vocabulary.

Why Is Marcus Garvey A National Hero?

Garvey grandly rose above the hateful definitions of blackness in Jamaican society and prophetically affirmed, “We are going to emancipate ourselves from mental slavery because whilst others might free the body, none but ourselves can free the mind”. Many of us sing along with Bob Marley, who popularised Garvey’s words in his “Redemption Song”. But do we fully comprehend the profundity of the exhortation to free the mind?

Who is Jamaica?

It was my high school English teacher, Miss Julie Thorne, who, for me, first interrogated the racial politics of the supposedly unifying motto. She had come from the United Kingdom to teach on an international development program much like the Peace Corps. As an outsider, she could immediately detect the fraudulence of the homogenizing racial myth. She asked us students a rather cynical question. “Out of many, one people? Which one?” Jamaican society in the 1960’s was highly stratified. The brown and white elite were the ‘one’ who ruled the ‘many’.

‘Worl-map Fi Stop Draw Jamaica Small!’

All of us foreigners who came, willingly or not, and now call this island our own, do have a sense of ancestral homelands. This speck of Jamaica is great because our conception of ourselves is not dependent solely on our present insular location.

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