Ruel Reid Better Tek Up Police Work

Inna Augustown, Miller still a write down di vision. An im sight di way Babylon system inna Jamaica fight down black people culture. Ina Augustown, Miller stil a rait dong di vishan. An im sait di wie Babilan sistim ina Jamieka fait dong blak piipl kolcha. In Augustown, Miller is still writing down the vision. And he 'sights' the way Babylon system in Jamaica fights down black people's culture.

Bob Marley’s Literary Legacy

Marley's Redemption Song is both a rejection of evangelical Christian orthodoxy and an affirmation of a new redemptive vision. So, Marley pays tribute to Marcus Garvey, who prophetically declared, "We are going to emancipate ourselves from mental slavery because whilst others might free the body, none but ourselves can free the mind."

Paying For Emancipation

The abolitionist, Sir Thomas Buxton, had urged his fellow parliamentarians to pay reparations to emancipated Africans. But, as Beckles notes, "[T]he British Parliament, densely populated with slaveholders and other beneficiaries of slave investments, did not take Buxton's suggestion seriously".

‘Bring In All Rastas, Dead Or Alive!’

Issuing a death sentence, Bustamante literally turned all Rastafarians into villains. Guilty or innocent, they could no longer expect to enjoy the protection of the law. All Rastafarians were completely demonised and became victims of comprehensive state brutality. The Coral Gardens 'Incident' was a chilling episode in a long history of state violence against Rastafari.

Taking Dennis Brown’s Name in Vain

I’m proposing that we celebrate the birthday of Dennis Brown and Bob Marley in February and that’s that. If we want a ‘Reggae Month’, let’s find a less hectic season. Cynics are already saying that ‘Reggae Month’ was intended to upstage ‘Black History Month’. You know how ambivalent we are about blackness in this country. Be that as it may, there are eleven other months from which to choose.

Peter Tosh Did Not Joke With Words

“So I mek them know me don’t run joke with words. Every time I see the word ‘peace’ you know where I see it? In the cemetery: ‘Here lies the body of such and such. May he rest in peace.’ So how a guy waan come tell me say him a go have a peace treaty amongst the living, where all the dead rest in wha? Peace? Ah-oh.”

Who is Jamaica?

It was my high school English teacher, Miss Julie Thorne, who, for me, first interrogated the racial politics of the supposedly unifying motto. She had come from the United Kingdom to teach on an international development program much like the Peace Corps. As an outsider, she could immediately detect the fraudulence of the homogenizing racial myth. She asked us students a rather cynical question. “Out of many, one people? Which one?” Jamaican society in the 1960’s was highly stratified. The brown and white elite were the ‘one’ who ruled the ‘many’.

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